How to “Sharpen” a Cove Edge Inside Corner

Shel Israel

Shel Israel (Image courtesy of Google+)

“It is amazing to me how the most mundane topics can come to life by stories that explain the challenges, details, process and pride that go into almost any work or craft.”

Shel Israel

These words could apply to a wide range of craft work, but Israel happened to be writing about the sign making trade, and – more specifically – referring to this very blog in its younger days. And so, in keeping with an esteemed tradition, here’s a bit of down-to-earth, nitty-gritty shop talk. This little photo series demonstrates how we “sharpen” an inside corner, after routing a cove edge with the hand router.

Then, of course, you have to repeat the process again for each inside corner. No wonder so many signs in this world are rectangular!

Fancy Shaped Sign for bridal shop

On this double-sided specimen, I had to “sharpen” twenty-four corners! I would love to replace this image with a beautiful photo of the sign, hanging from the building. It’s in Seattle. If you happen to pass by, please snap a picture & send it through!

 

It takes a little extra time to “cut-corners”, but it sure gives the sign a nice, crisp look.

Dard Hunter Lives On

“Art is the Flower. Life is the Green Leaf. Let every artist strive to make his flower a beautiful living thing, something that will convince the world that there may be, there are, things more precious more beautiful – more lasting than life itself.” – Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Past blog posts have discussed Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and his influence on the world of art and architecture, as an influential  member of the Arts and Crafts Movement (an art and design movement of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth). Clover Signs produced more than a few Mackintosh-inspired signs, which were displayed on earlier blog posts. Maybe that’s why we received a request early last month from a customer in New Mexico, USA, who wanted an office sign in the Arts and Crafts style.

We first experimented with a font developed by Mackintosh himself, and later settled on P22 Arts and Crafts, developed by Mackintosh’s well-known contemporary Dard Hunter. Mackintosh was an architect from Glasgow, while Hunter was an expert on printing and traditional papermaking from Ohio, USA. The fact that two men in such diverse professions and locations  were both significant to the Arts and Crafts style, is tribute to the breadth and scope of the movement itself.

Arts and Crafts Book Cover Page

A Printed Page in the Arts & Cafts Style (image courtesy of Vamp & Tramp Booksellers)

The Arts and Crafts style gradually petered out around the time of the Second World War. But since the nineteen-seventies, there has been a noticeable revival of the style, especially in architecture & typography. Countless Arts-and-Crafts fonts continue to be designed and released, Canadian sign-maker Shane Durnford (and many other modern-day craftsmen) could be considered Arts-and-Crafts-inspired, and there will be a Dard Hunter Conference in St. Louis this October, sponsored by the Friends of Dard Hunter.

An Arts-and-Crafts-style house number sign by David Meddings

An “upcycled” Arts-and-Crafts-style house number sign by David Meddings

A Paper-Making Workshop by the Friends of Dard Hunter

A Paper-Making Workshop by the Friends of Dard Hunter

And what about the office sign?

Office Sign Revision 2

The Original Design

Office Sign Revision 3

With the new font & custom-design arrow to match

Office Sign Revision 6

The final design

Dard Hunter Inspired Sign

And the finished sign

So that’s our humble contribution to the Arts and Crafts Revival (hanging on an office door in New Mexico).

“The sign arrived today and I’m more than pleased with its design and quality – really beautiful work.  Thanks to you and your excellent staff! I’m also very impressed with your packaging.  It seems as close to “bulletproof” as one can achieve in a practical sense.” – Chris